Freedom for All, Section 1 of the 14th Amendment

Due to the length of the Fourteenth Amendment with its four sections, I’m taking it one bite at a time. Starting with Section 1.

Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

This is the citizenship clause.

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.

If you were born here or was here in the beginning, 1791 was only 77 years earlier, and not a diplomat, are automatically a citizen.

No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

This was to keep the Southern States from passing discriminatory laws, like the Jim Crow laws, such as not allowing the newly freed slaves from arming themselves. This section was also cited in the Supreme Court case of Chicago vs. McDonald, where a citizen of that city fought against the gun ban laws. The Court ruled, thankfully, that the 14th says the 2nd applies to all states.

All together this granted citizenship to the slaves in an amendment to keep the Supreme Court from ruling it unconstitutional. It was pre-dated by the Civil Rights Act of 1866. This is the first section, Section 2 is next week.

What are your thoughts about this?

%d bloggers like this: